In season! De-constructing agbalumo

So, I started seeing them on the streets about three weeks ago while driving around the Island.  A number of sellers with their wheel barrows full of them have been strategically positioned on busy streets around town.  It was on a Saturday afternoon that it dawned on me that I haven’t eaten one in well over a long time. I pulled my car over and asked a mallam that was selling them in front of his Oga’s house how much they were…”twenty, twenty Naira madam”.  I picked out a few and brought them home.  Apparently, after scouring the Internet, I found out that these are a fruit native to the Americas and naturalised in not only Nigeria, but Ghana, Sri Lanka, India and Indonesia.  In Nigeria the seeds are commonly used to play local games and threaded together to create anklets for traditional dancers.  Who knew!  As I broke the first one down, it’s gummy sticky flesh wrapped around a smooth silky seed, the flavour brought back memories from way back when, when a girl was footloose and fancy free.  Oh Agbalumo, like this you’re in season, like that you’re out. Now slowly, but surely they’re going out of season because it’s been a few days since I’ve seen them on the streets.  Agbalumo, till next year when we shall meet again!

I cleaned out my first agbalumo in donkey’s years. Needless to say, my béllé don full!

 

5 Comments

  1. I can almost taste the fruit! ah the memories… enjoy sha!

  2. Loving this. Can’t wait to see more!

  3. I salivate thinking about other treats you have in store for us…

  4. I love udara aka “agbalumo”. The best is from cotonou and the east. They have what is “nwa nnu” the child of sweetness. It is as if it was injected with sugar. The ones you find in Lagos tend to be sour. I love em al anyways. Love the Photo!

  5. Love, love, love udara. Agbalumo. Cherry. Been trying to catalogue Naija fruits in season and I love that I’m not the only one.

    Love your blog name. Evocative of delicious, satisfying and nourishing food! Thanks to Adhis/Chef Afrik for the introduction

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